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Race

Usha Iyer


Usha Iyer's research and teaching interests lie at the intersection of cinema, performance, and gender and sexuality studies, with a specific focus on film and performance histories, body cultures, and Global South cultural traffic along the vectors of race, gender, caste, and religion.

Subini Annamma

Prior to her doctoral studies, Subini Ancy Annamma was a special education teacher in both public schools and youth prisons. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Her research critically examines the ways students are criminalized and resist that criminalization through the mutually constitutive nature of racism and ableism, how they interlock with other marginalizing oppressions, and how these intersections impact youth education trajectories in urban schools and youth prisons.

Rose Salseda

Professor Rose Salseda is an assistant professor in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University. Specializing in the fields of African American and U.S. Latinx art, Professor Salseda’s research explores the politics of race and representation in the United States.

Asad L. Asad

Asad L. Asad is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Stanford University and a faculty affiliate at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. His scholarly interests encompass social stratification, migration and immigrant incorporation, race/ethnicity, and health. Asad's current research agenda considers how institutions—particularly U.S. immigration policy and practice—mediate various facets of inequality.

Matthew Clair


Matthew Clair is Assistant Professor of Sociology and (by courtesy) Law at Stanford University. His scholarship examines how cultural meanings and interpersonal interactions reflect, reproduce, and challenge social inequality in laws, the legal profession, and the criminal legal system. He is the author of the book Privilege and Punishment: How Race and Class Matter in Criminal Court. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University.

Florencia Torche

Florencia Torche is a social scientist with substantive interests in social demography, stratification, and education. Professor Torche’s scholarship encompasses two related areas. A longer-term area of research studies inequality dynamics -- the dynamics that result in persistence of inequality across generations -- with a particular focus on educational attainment, assortative mating (who marries who), and the intergenerational transmission of wealth.

Steven O. Roberts

Steven Roberts is an assistant professor of psychology and a co-director of the Social Cognition and Development Lab in the Department of Psychology. He received his A.A. in Liberal Arts from the Borough of Manhattan Community College, B.S. in Applied Psychology from New York University, and M.S. and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Michigan. Broadly, Steven is interested in how people think about group boundaries. Key research questions include: How do we conceptualize social groups and how do our concepts guide how we perceive and evaluate individuals?

Sharad Goel

Sharad's primary area of research is computational social science, an emerging discipline at the intersection of computer science, statistics, and the social sciences. He's particularly interested in applying modern computational and statistical techniques to study social and political policies, such as stop-and-frisk, swing voting, filter bubbles, do-not-track, and media bias. Before joining Stanford, Sharad was a senior researcher at Microsoft Research and Yahoo Labs.

https://5harad.com

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