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Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

Jeanne Tsai

Jeanne L. Tsai is currently Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology at Stanford University, and the Director of the Stanford Culture and Emotion Lab. She earned her B.A. in psychology at Stanford, and then her PhD in clinical psychology at UC Berkeley. After doing her clinical internship and post-doc at UCSF in minority mental health, she was an assistant professor at the University of Minnesota from 1997-2000. She joined the faculty in the psychology department at Stanford in 2000. 

Hazel Markus

 

Hazel Rose Markus is the Davis-Brack Professor in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. Her research focuses on the role of self in regulating behavior and on the ways in which the social world shapes the self. Her work examines how cultures, including those of nation or region of origin, gender, social class, race, ethnicity, religion, and occupation, shape thought, feeling, and action.

Jeremy M Weinstein

Jeremy M. Weinstein is a Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He is also a non-resident fellow at the Center for Global Development in Washington, D.C.

Jackelyn Hwang

Jackelyn Hwang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a faculty affiliate at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Urban Studies Program. Jackelyn’s main research interests are in the fields of urban sociology, race and ethnicity, immigration, and inequality. In particular, her research examines the relationship between how neighborhoods change and the persistence of neighborhood inequality by race and class in US cities.

Angela Garcia

Professor Garcia’s work engages historical and institutional processes through which violence and suffering is produced and lived. A central theme is the disproportionate burden of addiction, depression and incarceration among poor families and communities. Her research is oriented toward understanding how attachments, affect, and practices of intimacy are important registers of politics and economy.

Duana Fullwiley

I am an anthropologist of science and medicine interested in how social identities, health outcomes, and molecular genetic findings increasingly intersect. In my first book, The Enculturated Gene: Sickle Cell Health Politics and Biological Difference in West Africa (Princeton, 2011), I draw on over a decade of ethnographic fieldwork in the US, France and Senegal.

Ana Raquel Minian

Ana Raquel Minian is an AssociateProfessor in the Department of History and the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE).  Her book, Undocumented Lives: The Untold History of Mexican Migration will come out in March 2018. Her work has also been published in American Quarterly and the Journal of American History. She is currently working on a new book project on the growth of the Latina/o population in the United States. 

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