Final celebration for Introduction to CSRE, 2023

Current Courses

Courses for the current academic year that satisfy degree requirements for all CCSRE degree programs are listed below.

Coursework for AY '23-'24

Wondering what courses will be offered this academic year that satisfy course requirements for CCSRE majors?

 

Below you will find collapsible textboxes that list and detail courses offered in 2023-2024 that will satisfy major requirements. For more information on any courses, you can always go to ExploreCourses and search by topic, course name, instructor, or discipline.

Gateway and Capstone Requirements

The gateway requirement for all CCSRE majors can be satisfied by taking CSRE 100. Find below course descriptions and '23-'24 schedule information for the gateway requirement.

CSRE 100: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (formerly CSRE 196C)

Course Description

Race and ethnicity are often taken for granted as naturally occurring, self-evident phenomena that must be navigated or overcome to understand and eradicate the (re)production of societal hierarchies across historical, geopolitical, and institutional contexts. In contrast, this transdisciplinary course seeks to track and trouble the historical and contemporary creation, dissolution, experiences, and stakes of various ethnoracial borders. Key topics include: empire, colonialism, capital/ism, im/migration, diaspora, ideology, identity, subjectivity, scientism, intersectionality, solidarity, resistance, reproduction, and transformation. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center for Public Service. Satisfies undergraduate Ways/General Education Requirements: Exploring Difference and Power (EDP); Social Inquiry (SI).

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Winter Quarter
Tues./Thurs. 3:00pm-4:20pm
Units: 5 
Instructor: Rosa, J.

 

The capstone requirement can be satisfied by completing CSRE 200X or, for honors students, CSRE 201X, 201Y, and 201Z. Find below course descriptions and '23-'24 schedule information for the capstone courses.

CSRE 200X - CCSRE Senior Seminar 

Course Description (200X)

This capstone course will support students in the completion of a public-facing research project or research paper that draws upon disciplinary expertise and training in race studies. A public-facing research project will translate social sciences and/or humanities research on race and ethnicity into genres that reach diverse audiences. After developing a research question and consulting with a faculty project mentor, students will conduct research, identify their audience, design a public-facing research project, and compose a substantial writer¿s memo that includes a literature review, an analysis of genre and audience, a discussion of stakes, and a plan for distribution. The process will require students to explore and justify the parameters of their projects, including their methodologies and academic interlocutors. Note that this course is required for CCSRE majors in their final year of study who are not enrolled in CSRE 201X, including those who opt to write honors theses in departments or programs outside of CSRE.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Autumn Quarter
Thurs. 3:00pm-4:20pm
Units: 5
Instructor: Alhassen, M.

CSRE201X, Y, and Z - CCSRE Honors Seminar 

Course Description (201X)

The CCSRE Honors Thesis Seminar is a research- and writing-intensive course designed to help students reflect on CCSRE coursework and to apply their skills, knowledge, and political commitments to the investigation of a focused research question. Comparative Studies of Race and Ethnicity at Stanford¿and the field of ethnic studies broadly¿has always worked to ground academic research in political practice, embodied experience, and community, and it systematically challenges disciplinary boundaries in the academy. Our weekly meetings and assignments are designed to scaffold your ongoing work with a faculty advisor and to facilitate our coming together as a community of writers, researchers, artists, and activists. Together, we will build a trusting, supportive community of scholars and work to gain clarity about the stakes of our methodologies and research projects. Required for CSRE Honors writers.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Autumn Quarter
Thurs. 3:00pm-4:20pm
Units: 5
Instructors: Atura Bushnell, A. (PI) ; Nielsen, N. (TA)

Course Description 201Y

Supports the research and writing of the CCSRE honors thesis with the support of a faculty project advisor and a secondary reader. Required for all admitted students completing an honors project in CCSRE, regardless of major.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Winter Quarter
Tue. 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM
Units: 5
Instructors: Atura Bushnell, A. (PI) ; Nielsen, N. (TA)

 

Course Description 201Z

Supports the research and writing of the CCSRE honors thesis with the support of a faculty project advisor and a secondary reader. Required for all admitted students completing an honors project in CCSRE, regardless of major.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Spring Quarter
Thurs. 3:00 PM - 4:20 PM
Units: 5
Instructors: Atura Bushnell, A. (PI) ; Nielsen, N. (TA)

Comparative Core Requirement

All CCSRE majors must take at least one of three comparative core courses (CSRE 101A, 101B, or 101C). Find below course descriptions and '23-'24 schedule information for the comparative core courses.

CSRE 101A: Indigeneity and Colonialism

This course charts processes of imperialism, colonization, and displacement. By looking at the history of colonialism with a focus on its impact on communities of color (e.g., slavery and genocide) and the legacy of colonization embedded in current systems of oppression (e.g., borders and dispossession), students will gain an understanding of how these systems work in tandem, how they continue to impact marginalized communities, and how they each can be traced back to issues of racial capitalism. The course concludes with studies in decolonial projects and epistemologies.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Winter Quarter
Wed. 3:00pm-4:20pm
Units: 5
Instructors: Stone, P. and Morrison, K.

 

CSRE 101B: Institutions and Inequities

This course offers frameworks for understanding institutional racism, racial capitalism, and the historical and contemporary ways through which these forces reinforce and maintain racial inequity across a variety of social sectors (e.g., health, media, education, criminal justice, and the environment). At the end of this course, students will be able to identify how race is institutionalized, how racialized institutions are interconnected, and how institutional violence can be combated.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

TBD

 

CSRE 101C: Resistance and Liberation

This course investigates strategies for racial and economic liberation by analyzing past and present social justice movements. Students will be exposed to theoretical frameworks for liberation (e.g., abolition, resistance, mutual aid, rematriation) and engage with how they are applied. At the end of this course, students will better understand how liberation can be achieved and will be able to apply anti-racist theory to their work at Stanford and beyond.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Spring Quarter, In-Person
Mon, Wed. 10:30 am-11:50 am
Units: 5
Instructors: Hammerman, S. and Hernandez-Clarke, G.

Methodology Requirement

To satisfy the research and methodology requirement, all CCSRE majors must complete at least one of the following courses (min. 3 units). Find below when each will be offered for AY '23-'24.

Autumn Quarter

  • ANTHRO 116: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research
  • ARTHIST 296: Junior Seminar: Methods & Historiography of Art History
  • COMM 106: Communication Research Methods 
  • CEE 139: Design Portfolio Methods 
  • COMM 106: Communication Research Methods
  • CS 109: Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
  • DATASCI 154: Solving Social Problems with Data
  • ECON 102A: Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
  • ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory (COMPLIT 161E) 
  • ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics 
  • ENGLISH 184E: Literary Text Mining 
  • FILMEDIA 50Q: The Video Essay: Writing with Video about Media and Culture
  • HISTORY 200D: Doing the History of Science and Technology
  • HISTORY 200F: Doing Microhistory
  • HISTORY 200GH: Doing Gender History
  • POLISCI 150A: Data Science for Politics
  • SOC 180A: Foundations of Social Research
  • STATS 110: Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences
  • STATS 160: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus

Winter Quarter

  • ANTHRO 91: Method and Evidence in Anthropology 
  • CS 109 - Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
  • ECON 102A: Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
  • ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory (COMPLIT 161E) 
  • ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics
  • FEMGEN 103: Feminist and Queer Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines
  • HISTORY 200A: Doing Legal History
  • HISTORY 200B: Doing Environmental History: Water Justice
  • HISTORY 200UR: Doing (Sub)Urban History
  • MUSIC 264: Musical Engagement
  • PUBLPOL 105: Empirical Methods in Public Policy 
  • SOC 126: Introduction to Social Networks 
  • SOC 180B: Introduction to Data Analysis 
  • STATS 160: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus 
  • URBANST 132: Concepts and Analytic Skills for the Social Sector

Spring Quarter

  • ANTHRO 93: Prefield Research Seminar
  • CEE 139: Design Portfolio Methods
  • CS 109: Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
  • DATASCI 154: Solving Social Problems with Data
  • ENGLISH 161: Narrative and Narrative Theory (COMPLIT 161E) 
  • ENGLISH 160: Poetry and Poetics 
  • HISTORY 200Y: Doing Colonial History 
  • MUSIC 264: Musical Engagement
  • PUBLPOL 105: Empirical Methods in Public Policy
  • STATS 160: Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus 
  • URBANST 123B: Community Engaged Research - Principles, Ethics, and Design
Community Engaged Learning (CEL) Requirement

CCSRE students are required to complete at least one community-engaged learning (CEL) course or co-curricular experience. This requirement may be fulfilled by enrolling in a Cardinal Course, completing a CCSRE Undergraduate Fellowship, or participating in an Alternative Spring Break. Below are CEL courses offered for AY '23-'24. Students who wish to meet the CEL requirement through a co-curricular experience (e.g. research fellowship) should fill out this form.

 

CSRE 103B: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (EDUC 103B)

Course Description

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Winter Quarter
Thu 9:30-11:20am
Units: 4
Instructor: Levine, S.

 

NATIVEAM 112: Muwekma Community Engaged Learning, Cultural Heritage and Native Plants Garden Field Project 

Course Description

This course will allow students interested in working with the Muwekma Ohlone Tribe to engaged in community based participatory research. More specifically students will be creating tending and maintaining a native plants garden in the area surrounding the dish. Students will be required to learn about the biotic community and plants used by California native people in a demonstration and educational garden. Course discussions include food sovereignty in indigenous communities, tribal land trusts, and working with indigenous and native communities as a form of field based learning, and service learning. Course will emphasize protocols and specific methods in Indigenous spaces. Cultural heritage and archaeological surveys and mapping may be a a part of this course, depending upon the needs of the Muwekma community. Workdays will be scheduled Saturdays from 10:00 to 12:30 pm. Other projects may include educational projects for k-12 students, in as well as field trips to archaeological sites in ancestral spaces within the territory of Muwekma Ohlone. Other projects to be determined by local tribal members.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Autumn Quarter
Fri. 1:30-2:50pm
Units: 2-3
Instructor: Wilcox, M.

 

CSRE 125E: Shades of Green: Exploring and Expanding Environmental Justice in Practice

Course Description

Historically, discussions of race, ethnicity, culture, and equity in the environment have been shaped by a limited view of the environmental justice movement, often centered on urban environmental threats and separated from other types of environmental and climate advocacy. This course will seek to expand on these discussions by exploring topics such as access to outdoor spaces, definitions of wilderness, inclusion in environmental organizations, gender and the outdoors, the influence of colonialism on ways of knowing, food justice and ethics, and the future of climate change policy. The course will also involve a community partnership project. In small groups students will work with an environmental organization to problem-solve around issues of equity, representation, and access. We value a diversity of experiences and epistemologies and welcome undergraduates from all disciplines. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation and commitment to community partnerships. This course requires instructor approval, please submit an application by March 16th at midnight. Application available at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScUPqBjGGkM18JSAjG1ecZgXlIS9pFUIUebLMyfthSLx9K-QQ/viewform?usp=sf_link.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Spring Quarter
Tue, Thu 1:30-2:50pm
Units: 3-4
Instructor: Diver, S.

 

CSRE 146B: Community Engaged Research - Principles, Ethics, and Design

Course Description

This course is designed to support students planning to participate in community engaged research experiences during the summer 2023 term. Course materials and discussions will promote deep engagement with, and reflection on, the principles, practices, and ethics of community engaged research as a unique orientation to scholarly inquiry and social action that centers the interests and assets of the communities with whom researchers partner. On a practical level, the course will help students develop or clarify a collaborative research design process and build professional and project-specific skills in consultation with their mentors and community collaborators. This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students. We particularly encourage the involvement of students who will be participating in partnership-based research activities over the summer.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Spring Quarter
Mon, Wed 3-4:20 pm
Units: 3
Instructor: Hurd, C.

 

CSRE 199: Community-Based Fellowship Practicum

Course Description

This course is designed to support undergraduate Community-Based Research and Praxis Fellows at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Students will situate their research and praxis projects in the context of global, multigenerational social movements; examine the historical and present role of the academy in community-engaged research and community-building; and develop professional and project-specific skills in consultation with their community partners. Over the course of the quarter, fellows will develop frameworks for sustainable partnerships and critical perspectives on the principles, limits, and possibilities of their work. Enrollment by instructor permission only.

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Spring Quarter
Units: 3
Instructor: Allen, S.

 

CSRE 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development

Course Description

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).

Schedule for AY '23-'24

Spring Quarter
Units: 3-5

Major Core Courses

Students majoring in Asian American Studies, Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies, Jewish Studies, or Native American Studies are also required to take core curriculum in their respective major. Below are major core offerings for '23-'24.

Asian American Studies Major Core

ASNAMST 100: Introduction to Asian American Studies

Course Description: What is meant by the term Asian American? How have representations of Asian Americans influenced concepts of US citizenship and belonging? What are the social and political origins of the Asian American community? This course provides a critical introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Asian American studies. Drawing on historical, creative, and scholarly texts, the course examines the history and possibilities of Asian American community. To do this, we place the Asian American experience within a transnational context, paying particular attention to the ways that Asian American lives have been shaped by the legacies of US wars in Asia and by the history of US racism. In the process, we examine the role that representations of Asian Americans have played in shaping the boundaries of US citizenship and belonging. Throughout the course, we utilize our discussions of Asian American racialization and community formation to think critically about the social and political ramifications that the designation Asian American entails.

Winter Quarter
Tue, Thu 12-1:20pm
Units: 4
Instructor: Dinh, M.

 

Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies Major Core

CHILATST 100: Introduction to Latinx Studies

Course Description: This course introduces students to Latinx studies drawing on both the distinct and intra-ethnic experiences of the diasporic Latinx population in the United States. Introduction to Latinx studies examines the international processes (e.g., wars of imperialism, colonialism, immigration, migration, legislative policies) as central forces in the formation of U.S. Latinx communities, including the historical influences of Caribbean, Central and South American cultures in American society. This global perspective will accompany a more specific focus on the relationship between Latinx culture and American society, the dynamic role of women in the shaping of Latinx communities, and origins and place of Latin American-diasporic communities in U.S. society. Through an interdisciplinary scholarly lens and archival research, we analyze the history of Latinx migration, immigration, and the social justice and civil rights leaders and organizations who advocated for full citizenship rights. We study artists and the spaces where Latinx art has been transformative across cultures, the nation, and international spaces. We analyze the Latinx diasporic communities and trace their journeys across borders and advocacy for civil rights. Our discussions will include a history and analysis of language, art, music, folktales, and tools that shape the Latinx community. Including Latinx ingenuity, innovation, and major contributions in the sciences, humanities among other fields. Students will read an assortment of foundational humanities and social science literature on the U.S. Latinx experience as well as strengthen writing abilities, sharpen critical thinking skills, and develop archival research.

Autumn Quarter
Mon, Wed 3:30-5:20pm
Units: 5
Instructor: Ornelas Rodríguez, I.

 

Jewish Studies Major Core

JEWISHST 115: Understanding Jews

Course Description: This discussion-based course will give students an opportunity to explore the constellation of religious, ethnic, national, cultural, artistic, spiritual, and political forces that shape Jewish life in the 21st century. Drawing on historical documents, classical texts, and contemporary events, this course will give students from any background an opportunity to ask hard questions, deepen their own understandings, and challenge their conceptions of what makes Jewish life 'Jewish.' No matter where you went for Sunday school - church, synagogue, the woods, or nowhere at all - this course is a chance to question what you know, and interrogate how you came to know what you know about Jews, Judaism, and Jewish culture.

Autumn Quarter
Wed. 5:30-7:30pm
Units: 1-3
Instructor: Kelman, A.

 

Native American Studies Major Core

NATIVEAM 100: Decolonizing Methodologies: Introduction to Native American Studies

Course Description: This course provides students with an introductory grasp on major concepts, theoretical highlights, and important figures in Native American and Indigenous Studies, also known as American Indian Studies or First Nations Studies. The discipline emerged in the United States during the late 1960s when Native student-activists demanded the inclusion of their histories alongside the dominant white settler narratives in universities' educational catalog. By examining historical and legal documents, storytelling accounts, images, films, and literary works, students will explore a diverse range of themes and perspectives, gaining an understanding of Native American cultures, histories, and contemporary lifeworlds. The course emphasizes materials from relevant sources produced by and about Natives to foster critical thinking and analysis. It also aims to cultivate an appreciation for the richness and complexity of Native American experiences while introducing major concepts, theoretical highlights, and important figures in the field of Native American Studies. Throughout the course, students will explore the global development of the discipline from a pan-Indian perspective, discussing keywords, histories, politics, disciplinary concerns, and the recent "decolonial turn" within academia. By the end of the course, students will have an introductory understanding of key disciplinary jargon, methodological research, and constitutive issues in Native American Studies.

Autumn Quarter
Tue, Thu 3-4:20pm
Units: 5
Instructor: Stone, P.